Best Putter for Bad Putters

Best Putter for Bad Putters

We all know how crucial those shots close to the cup are – you could have the most perfect swing, be great at short chips, and wind up with multiple putts ruining your entire game. Even if you’ve been golfing for years, you may still have trouble sinking the ball purely because you haven’t found the right club for you yet. So, if you’re a bad putter, a high handicapper, or even an experienced golfer simply looking to improve your putting skills, check out these options for the best putter for you.

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Our Top Picks - Best Putter For Bad Putters

TaylorMade Golf Spider X Putters

TaylorMade Golf Spider X

Thanks to the high MOI on the Spider, these putters are among the most forgiving and popular with players of all levels. The Roll Groove Technology of the insert improves RPM and thus, the roll as well as distance and most importantly, the consistency.

The groove technology with a 45-degree angle provides better control and increases topspin to keep the ball headed on its intended line, while the perimeter weighting with higher MOI improves forgiveness. This line of putters also has moveable weight options which provide flexibility if you’re willing to experiment.

Coming in navy, chalk, or copper colors, these putters also feature a Surlyn face (which most golf balls are coated in) resulting in a soft feel. The Spider has a short slant hosel and moderate toe hang, which enables arcing stroke players to enjoy this style of club too.

Although these putters can take a bit of getting used to, there’s good reason these are popular among high handicappers and pros alike – they offer both accuracy and consistency as well as forgiveness. They certainly aren’t the cheapest option on this list, but many players attest to them being worth dishing out a few extra dollars.

Type: Mallet

Pros
  • One of the most successful putters on the Tour
  • Excellent balance and consistent roll
  • Highly forgiving putter
  • Re-engineered Pure Roll Insert improves sound, feel and roll
  • Groove technology promotes forward spin which increases accuracy and distance
  • Good for both straight and arc stroke players
Cons
  • Sizeable investment

Cleveland Golf Huntington Beach Collection

This collection features a wide range of head shapes and designs (9 tour-proven shapes), meaning you’ll have no troubles finding the right style for you. There are center-shafted options along with mallets, fang-style, and blade models.

The Huntington Beach Collection has an optimized center of gravity for better feel and stability. The precision milling and unique diamond pattern increases friction, providing a softer feel at impact and consistent roll for these putters. The 304 stainless steel provides a balance of the right feedback and softer feel, although the SOFT acronym does not refer to this. SOFT stands for Speed Optimized Face Technology, which “normalizes ball speed across the entire face of the putter, even on off-center putts”, leading to consistent speed control and distance performance.

Type: Blade (Soft 1, 3, 4, and 8), or Mallet (Soft 2, 6, 6C, 10, and 11)

Pros
  • Variety of head styles to choose from and suit any putting style
  • 304 stainless steel approved by many golfers
  • Milling pattern for consistency and increased forgiveness
  • High quality, well-weighted putters provide great feel
  • Heavy mallet, large head styles great for slower greens
Cons
  • Some find the weight of the head too light

Callaway Odyssey White Hot Pro 2.0 Putter

This popular putter is much-loved by high handicappers with a slight arc stroke, thanks to its consistency, forgiveness, and easy alignment aids. The heel-toe weighted blade putter is responsive upon impact and has a laser milled insert to increase the stability and forgiveness of the club head.

Odyssey’s iconic White Hot insert has been re-designed and results in better sound and feel. Firmer than previous models, these inserts provide great roll.

Type: Blade

Pros
  • Iconic White Hot insert – one of the best face inserts on the Tour
  • Great response and feel
  • Durable and forgiving
  • Simple design without glare
  • Crank-neck hosel and full-shaft offset
  • Consistent roll
Cons
  • Can take a bit to get used to
  • No oversized grip option

TaylorMade TP Patina Collection

The seven club head options in the Patina line all feature a black nickel and copper finish with a 5mm thick aluminum Pure Roll insert to improve perimeter weighting and feel, as well as sound and performance. The insert is fastened with two screws in the cavity to “create a tight bond that minimizes voids or air pockets underneath the insert for a more solid feel at impact”.

These putters have a solid feel and provide an excellent roll with the thicker grooved insert appearing to give your putt a bit more speed. You may also wish to add custom TP sole weights to hit a specific swing weight.

The Soto and Juno are perfect choices for fans of traditional blades, while the Del Monte is a heavier blade option. The Ardmore and DuPage mallets will provide better stability on those off-center hits.

Type: Blade (Del Monte, Juno, Soto), Mallet (Ardmore, DuPage)

Pros
  • Seven club head options to suit all styles
  • Attractive design, copper finish stands out
  • Designed to get ball rolling quickly
  • Pure Roll insert with 45-degree grooves to increase top spin and accuracy
  • Custom TP sole weights available
Cons
  • Color scheme could be distracting
  • Some say the previous range had easier alignment

Pinemeadow Golf PGX Putter

Pinemeadow Golf PGX Putter

Those players looking to avoid breaking the bank will appreciate the very affordable price tag on this putter. With great value for money, this mallet-style putter has good weight balance to improve roll and control while the white finish provides a great contrast against the green for better alignment and accuracy.

At 380g, this mallet putter has an additional 40g of weight for better balance and feel, promoting true spin, reducing skidding and making this putter ideal for faster greens.

Type: Mallet

Pros
  • Best budget putter, great value for money
  • Style and design easier for high handicappers
  • Alignment design with three lines is great
  • Good weighting and balance
  • Great for faster greens
Cons
  • Quality not as good as bigger brands, hence the cheaper price
  • Can discolor quickly, needing frequent cleaning
  • Some find it a bit too heavy at 380g

Wilson Staff Harmonized Putter M5

The M5 features a larger grip than previous models, giving you improved control and less slippage thanks to the large grip. The plumber hosel and semi-mallet putter head provide better control and improve the feel during your stroke, while the microinjection polymer face insert allows for better feel on impact with the ball.

This putter is ideal for mid to high handicappers, having red and white alignment lines to line up the putt more accurately. It is also more forgiving when you do have those off-center strikes. However, if you’re a more experienced player or just a better putter in general, you may find this a bit too bulky.

Type: Mallet

Pros
  • Competitive pricing
  • Micro-injection polymer face insert
  • Easy alignment design makes longer putts more accurate
  • Well-balanced head design
  • Soft feel comfortable grip
  • Vertical seam grip for improved feel
Cons
  • Slightly bulky
  • Does not include head cover
  • Some say it’s poor quality, but good for the price

Choosing a Putter – Things to Consider

Looks

Just like wearing the right attire can make or break your golf game, so too can using the improper putter. The most important thing when selecting your putter is to ensure you like the look of it first. Yes, it may sound a bit silly but really, if you won’t take it from here, take it from Tiger Woods – he begins to narrow down his search by looks alone, then starts to test them only after deciding he enjoys the aesthetics.

If you don’t enjoy looking at your putter, you’re already putting yourself a step behind since this club is the one you’ll use most and needs to inspire confidence. Additionally, you’ll want to check that you like the alignment aids. Some players prefer long lines on the putter where others want as few lines and dots as possible.

Putting Style

Your style of putting significantly impacts the type of putter best suited to you. There are two main methods when putting: the arc stroke or the straight back, straight through style. The styles basically explain themselves; from the stroke’s start to finish, straight back, straight through players attempt to keep the head of the putter squarely aligned with the ball. Players with arc strokes have a pronounced arc where the putter’s face opens in the back and closes through the stroke, rather than following a straight line.

Those golfers with an arc stroke style will find better performance from a blade (or anser) type of putter, as the increased weight in the toe allows the face to be square at impact.

Straight back, straight through types will find improvements with a mallet style club as the weight is balanced and allows for a straighter stroke.

Head Shape

Blade – The oldest and simplest type of putter, with narrow, flat clubheads providing excellent feel. A popular choice for golfers with lower handicaps or those with arc styles, as they are typically toe-weighted and have minimal alignment aids.

Mallet – The large, rounded clubheads with a bigger and more forgiving face often feature a target line to align your putt. Most of these putters will be face-balanced, optimizing the straight back, straight through motion.

High MOI (moment of inertia) – The heavier head weight makes these putters great for high handicappers and those with either style of putting. The weight is typically equal across the putter, making these middle-balanced and much more forgiving if you happen to hit the ball off-center.

Head Balance

Face-balanced putters keep the face of the club squarely aligned for impact, best for those straight back, straight through players. You can easily recognize these clubheads as the putter face will point directly upward while the shaft is balanced.

Toe-balanced putters will square the face of the club at impact, best for players with arc strokes. The toe of the putter will drop toward the ground while the shaft is balanced.

Putter Shaft

Although most putters have a heel shaft, there are some on the market with a center or toe shaft option.

Center shafts will (mostly) have equal weight in the heel and toe of the club, thus balancing the face. Best for straight swings, this shaft will suit players keeping their eyes directly above the ball.

Heel shafts are the standard type and best for arc styles as it won’t be as difficult to rotate the head of the club during the putt as a center shaft.

Putter Length

Many golfers completely ignore the length of the putter when choosing their club, despite it playing a significant role in their posture. Whether you’re more of an upright putter or a hunched over type, you need the correct length for you to prevent ruining your putting line. All too often, golfers choose a length that is too much for their style. It’s quite simple to fix this issue, however; if you find yourself holding the club below the grip, grab a shorter-length shaft. If you’re noticing your lower back is hurting, try a longer putter.

To choose the proper length for you, simply get into your putting position, relax your shoulders and let your arms dangle, and measure the distance from just above the top of your hands down to the ground to get your putter length.  

For those of you who can’t be bothered with the task of measuring, follow these basic guidelines:

  • Under five feet tall: > 32 inches
  • Five feet to 5’4”: roughly 33 inches
  • 5’5” to 5’10”: roughly 34 inches
  • 5’10” or taller: 35+ inches

In Summary

Getting a properly fitted putter requires a lot of consideration. When searching for your secret weapon, keep an eye out for one which:

  • Looks great and inspires confidence.
  • Suits your stroke (arc vs straight) with the right shape and balance for your style.
  • Is the right length for you/your posture.

With all these factors in mind, let’s move on to our top choices for the best putters for bad putters out there.

Conclusion – Best Putters For Bad Putters

Putting, the simplest part of golf, is arguably the most frustrating aspect of the game and what sets good golfers apart from great ones. If you’ve been struggling with mastering the skill, it might boil down to a number of reasons: your stroke, posture, grip… or it could simply be that you haven’t chosen the correct tool for the job. So, go ahead, give one of these best putters for bad putters a go and see the dramatic difference it can make in your golf game.

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